Strawberry Hill Plantation

OVERVIEW

Location: Forkland, Greene County, Alabama
Date Constructed/ Founded: unknown
Associated Surnames: Walton, Webb
Historical Notes: William Walton and his family migrated from South Carolina ot Alabama around 1820.
Associated Pages: none


ASSOCIATED ENSLAVED PERSONS

1830: 49 slaves [1830 United States Federal Census, Greene Co., AL, Wm. Walton]

1840: 25 slaves [1840 United States Federal Census, Greene Co., AL, William Walton]

1850: 101 slaves [1850 U.S. Federal Census – Slave Schedules, Greene Co., AL, Justina L. Walton]

ASSOCIATED FREE PERSONS

Walton family: William Walton (b.1767-d.1844) – plantation owner; Justina “Jessie” Louisa Gennerick Walton (b.1790-d.1868) – wife of William Walton (m.1807), inherited Strawberry Hill in 1844; Amelia Tillman Walton (b.1807-d.1855) – daughter of W. and J.L.G. Walton; Jistina Gennerick Walton (b.1809-d.?) – daughter ofW. and J.L.G. Walton; John Gennerick Walton (b.1811-d.1870) – son ofW. and J.L.G. Walton; Louisa Whiteford Walton (b.1823-d.?) – daughter of W. and J.L.G. Walton; Jane Elizabeth Walton (b.1829-d.1837) – daughter of W. and J.L.G. Walton; Jennie McIntire Walton (b.1775-d.1799) – second wife of W. Walton (m.1794); Clarissa Tilghman Walton (b.1795) – daughter of W. and J.M. Walton; James Stewart Walton (b.1796) – son of W. and J.M. Walton; Alfred Young Walton (b.1798) – son of W. and J.M. Walton

Webb family: James Daniel Webb (b.1818-d.1863); Justina Smith Walton Webb (b.1831-d.?) – daughter of W. and J.L.G. Walton, wife of James Daniel Webb (m.1853)

 


RESEARCH LEADS AND RECORDS

  • Walton Family Papers, 1804-1868, Greene County, Alabama. This collection consists chiefly of nineteenth-century personal correspondence and financial and legal papers of the Walton and Webb families. There are also miscellaneous loose writings and six maps, circa 1820s, of land in western Alabama. Although William Walton and his wife Justina L. Walton owned and operated a cotton plantation in Greene County, Alabama, there are few items directly related to the running of the plantation or to the approximately 100 slaves who lived and worked there. [Walton Family Papers #1437, Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill]

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION

None noted yet


REFERENCES

 

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